Step by Step Stitch Guide

Scroll down the page or click on the link below to find the crochet guide you need.

The Slip Knot

The Chain Stitch

The Slip Stitch

The Magic Crochet Ring

The UK Double, US Single Stitch

The UK Half Treble, US Half Double Stitch

The UK Treble, US Double Stitch

The UK Double Treble, US Treble Stitch

The UK Triple Treble, US Double Treble Stitch

The Slip Knot

Whether it be knitting or crochet you need to start with a slip knot to get the yarn onto your needle. To create one of these …..

1. Cross the yarn coming from the ball over the yarn end (tail) to form a circle.

2. Pop the circle you have just made over the yarn which is coming from the ball.

3. Pick up the yarn that lies under the middle of your circle with your needle and pull it through to form a loop.

4.Gradually tighten your loop to form the knot by pulling your yarn ends firmly.

Your slip knot is made. Remember to make sure your completed slip knot can slide easily along your needle.

The Chain Stitch

The chain stitch (abbreviation = ch) is used to create the base or foundation of your work. Once you have chained your stitches you can use them as they are to crochet in rows or join them with a slip stitch into a foundation ring to crochet in a circle. You need to work this loosely enough so that your hook can enter each chain easily.

1.The first thing you will need on your hook is a slip knot.

2. Next, wrap your yarn around your hook (abbreviation  = yrh). I tend to do this by moving my hook under, behind and over the yarn.

3. Draw the yarn through the slip knot to make a loop. It helps if you hold the tail end of your yarn near the slip knot with your fingers at this point!.

4. You have now made your first chain.

5. Repeat this progress, by wrapping your yarn around the hook and drawing this loop through the centre of each new stitch you have just made. The front of your chain looks like a series of Vs, the back has raised bumps running through it.

6. Carry on until you have the number of stitches you need. To find out how many stitches you have, count back from your hook. The loop that is still on the hook and your slip knot don’t count! Just to help  – the needle in the photo below is pointing to the first stitch you would count.

The Slip Stitch

The Slip Stitch is the shortest crochet stitch and is used to join in new yarn, turn chain stitches into foundation rings and for moving ‘invisibly’ across your piece of work to get your yarn to where you want it.

It’s pretty similar to the chain stitch so you should have it mastered in no time!

1. Once you have made your foundation chain, pop your hook through the second chain from the hook.

2. Wrap your yarn around the hook.

3. Next, draw a loop of yarn through your chain stitch and the loop on your hook – your first slip stitch is made! It helps if you keep your work steady by holding the base of your chain between your thumb and fingers.

4. Repeat this process by inserting your hook into the next stitch on your foundation chain. Try and keep your stitches quite loose so your work doesn’t bunch. Here’s that sequence again to help.

Continue until you reach the end of your row.

If you wanted a second row of slip stitches, you would need to make what’s called a ‘turning chain’ which brings your hook up to the right height to start your new row. For the short slip stitch, you only need a 1 stitch turning chain.

The UK Double / US Single Stitch

As you will of probably guessed from the title, in the UK we call this a double stitch (abbreviation = dc) and our US friends call it a single stitch (abbreviation = sc). This stitch makes a firm, dense fabric which is why it’s good for making toys and containers.

1. Insert your hook through the second chain of your foundation chain.

2. Wrap your yarn around the hook.

3. Draw the yarn through the chain stitch to make a loop – you should have 2 loops on your hook.

4. Wrap your yarn around the hook again.

5. Drawn the yarn back through both loops on your hook – you should have one loop left on your hook. Your stitch is made!

6. To finish your row, follow the steps above to make one UK double (or US single) stitch into each chain of the foundation row.

7. Before you start the next row, turn your work, make a turning chain of one (hopefully you can see this in the next picture) and then pop your hook through the top of the first stitch on the row below to carry on stitching!

If you are after a ridged surface on your fabric, insert your hook only through the back loops of the top edge of your previous row. If you are after a flat surface, insert the hook through both loops. When I crochet, I normally go through both loops.

8. Another row completed! How does yours look?

The UK treble, US double stitch

If you are like me and like your work to grow fast, you are going to love this stitch. It is quite soft and has a more open pattern so it’s great for clothes and accessories.

1. Once you have made your foundation chain, wrap your yarn around your hook.

2. Insert through the 4th chain from the hook.

3. Wrap your yarn around the hook.

4. Draw the yarn through the chain, giving you 3 loops on your hook.

5. Wrap your yarn around your hook again.

6. Draw the yarn through 2 loops, there should be 2 further loops left on your hook.

7. Wrap the yarn around your hook for a final time.

8. Draw the yarn through the last 2 loops to give you 1 remaining loop on your hook. Your stitch is made!

9. To finish the row, repeat the steps above to make one stitch in each chain.

10. At the end of the row, turn your work and make 3 chain stitches for your turning chain.

11. To begin your next row, wrap your yarn around your hook and insert it into the 2nd stitch (under both top loops) and carry on the sequence above.

The UK half treble, US half double stitch

This ‘half’ business sounds complicated doesn’t it? Don’t worry, it’s fine. The steps below will have you half trebling (if you’re using UK terminology; abbreviation = htr) or half doubling (for our US hookers; abbreviation = hdb) in no time! The fabric produced with this stitch is great for baby garments as it is still firm like the UK double (US single), but a little softer to touch.

1. Once you’ve made your foundation chain, wrap your yarn around your hook then insert it into the 3rd chain from the hook.

2. Wrap your yarn around the hook again.

3. Draw the loop through the chain stitch to give you 3 loops on your hook.

4. Wrap your yarn around the hook again.

5. Draw the loop through all 3 loops on your hook to give you 1 loop on the hook. Your stitch is complete!

6. Complete the row by making one UK half treble (US half double) into each chain.

7. For the next row, turn your work, make a turning chain of 2, wrap your yarn around your hook and insert under the top 2 loops of the 1st  stitch to start your new row.

Another row completed!

The UK double treble, US treble stitch

If you have been trying out my posts, you will already have learnt how to do the most common crochet stitches, the UK double (US single), UK half treble (US half double) and UK treble (US double) and will be ready to try out some patterns.

However, there are two further taller stitches, UK double treble (US treble) and UK triple treble (US double treble) which I thought would be useful to take you through as they are often used in lace crochet.

So, here’s the first of the two, the UK double treble (US treble).

1. Make your foundation chain, then wrap your yarn around your hook twice.

2. Insert your hook into the 5th chain from the hook.

3.Wrap your yarn around the hook again.

4. Draw the loop of yarn back through the chain – you should have 4 loops on your hook.

5. Wrap your yarn around the hook.

6. Draw the yarn back through the first 2 loops on your hook – you should have 3 loops left on your hook.

7. Wrap your yarn around the hook.

8. Again, draw the yarn back through the first 2 loops on your hook – you should have 2 loops left on your hook.

9. Wrap your yarn around the hook for the last time.

10. Draw the yarn back through the remaining 2 loops on your hook to give you 1 loop on your hook. Your stitch is complete!

11. Work one treble into each chain as above until you finish your row. As you will see the missed stitches on your foundation row bends up – and will counts as your first stitch.

12. At the end of the row, turn your work and make a 4 chain turning chain. Wrap the yarn around your hook twice and then pop it through the top chains of your 2nd stitch (where the pin in the pic is pointing).

13. Work your next treble into the top loops of the 2nd stitch of your new row. The last stitch is worked into top of your 4 chain turning row.

Check you work by counting up the number of pillars in each row. If you are after a square shape you should have the same number of pillars in each. If you are gaining stitches you may have worked into the same stitch twice, if you are loosing stitches you may of not worked your last stitch into the top of your previous turning chain.

The UK Triple Treble, US Double Treble Stitch

The last stitch I’m going to take your through is known as the triple treble in the UK or double treble in the US. It’s a tall stitch and often used for open lace work.

1. Once you have made your foundation row, wrap the yarn around your hook 3 times.

2. Insert your hook into the 6th chain from the hook.

3. Wrap your yarn around the hook and draw a loop through your chain to give you 5 loops on your hook. Wrap your yarn around your hook again and draw a loop through the first two stitches on your hook (4 loops on hook).

4.  Wrap your yarn around your hook and draw a loop through the first two stitches on your hook (3 loops on hook).  Wrap your yarn around your hook again and draw a loop through the first two stitches on your hook (2 loops on hook).

5. Wrap your yarn around your hook and draw a loop through the last 2 stitches on your hook (1 loop on hook). Your stitch is finished!

6. Work a UK triple treble, US double treble into each chain stitch until you finish your row.

7. Turn your work, make a 5 chain turning chain and insert your hook into the top of the second stitch in a similar way to step 12 of the double treble (UK) stitch.

The photo, below right, shows 2 orange rows of UK triple treble (US double treble) and on the right, 2 green rows of UK double treble (US treble). Both were worked on the same size hook with similar gauge yarn – can you see the difference in stitch height?

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8 thoughts on “Step by Step Stitch Guide

  1. Best ever comparison, simple and uncomplicated instructions – just the way I like my crochet patterns. Thank you very, very much.

  2. Pingback: Pattern Share: Crochet Heart Tutorial | 2heartscrochet

  3. Pingback: Crocheted Dolls, 3-4 hr project | kerensablogs

  4. Pingback: Step by Step Stitch Guide | Sugar's Sweet Stitches

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