Attic 24 Granny Stripe Blanket and Edging – tried and tested

Way back in March, I was introduced to Lucy’s Attic 24 blog and her Granny Stripe Blanket. The gorgeous Granny Stripe blanket is an amazing array of colour and at around £1.85 per 100g ball of yarn (Stylecraft Special Double Knit) I had to have a go!

My Attic 24 Granny Stripe Blanket

Lucy’s Attic 24 Granny Stripe blanket uses 17 balls of yarn in the following shades: Pomegranate, Plum, Meadow, Fondant, Wisteria, Aspen, Saffron, Aster, Shrimp, Lipstick, Lavender, Spring Green, Magenta, Sherbert, Clematis, Turquoise, Cloud Blue. Due to Lucy’s Attic 24 fame some companies are also selling Attic 24 yarn packs which consist of a ball of each beautiful colour (it works out a bit cheaper to buy your yarn this way!).

Once my yarn arrive, it was time to play! Should I go for a rainbow stripe blanket?

Or more of a zingy feel with complementary stripes? You can see from the photo below which layout won!

Although Lucy uses her colours in a random order, I opted for a repeating pattern as after a day at work, it meant I only had to reach for the next ball rather than think about colours. To make sure I could remember the colour order, I made a note on each yarn label to indicate its position in the sequence.

As I began to work my Granny Stripe blanket I decided I needed another yellow stripe to break up the turquoise and cloud blue – the beauty of using this yarn is that its easy to find in the UK so getting hold of my 18th ball was no problem.

So, my final colour order was: Pomegranate, Plum, Meadow, Fondant, Wisteria, Aspen, Saffron, Aster, Shrimp, Lipstick, Lavender, Spring Green, Magenta, Sherbert, Clematis, Turquoise, Saffron (second stripe), Cloud Blue.

Before you start your blanket Lucy recommends making a small 21 chain sample – this is a top tip and it really helps you to understand the pattern and how it is formed.

It’s also best to start your fabulous blanket when you are feeling in a ‘counting’ mood as it’s all about getting the count of your first few rows right. By the time you are onto row 4, you will be well away! You’ll be hooking your UK treble (US double) clusters into the previous row spaces without thinking!

Lucy recommends using a 240 chain foundation stitch for a double bed size blanket – I found this to be about right – although I didn’t think my foundation chain was long enough when I started, as your blanket grows, the width (as well as length)seems to increases like magic! The way my blanket worked up, I was able to get 5 stripes (10 rows) out of each ball of yarn.

Here’s my blanket after my 4th colour,

And after my 7th colour change…

…….90 colour stripes and 7 months later…

……. it was time to work in my ends….

And Voila! My Attic 24 Granny Stripe Blanket was there!

Incase you’re wondering - this is what was left of my 18 balls of yarn.

To work my blanket border, I used 3 more balls of Stylecraft yarn. Again, I thank Lucy and her Attic 24 blog for my border inspiration! First I worked a UK treble (US double) cluster round in Plum. To make my corners flat, I worked *1 x UK treble cluster, 3 chain,1 x UK treble cluster* into the corner space.

…. this was followed by a round of UK Treble (US double) stitches in Clematis. To keep the corners smooth, I worked 3 UK trebles into each corner space.

…….and then it was second round of UK treble (US double) stitches in Lavender, followed by a round of UK double (US single) stitches in Plum….

…….and a final Picot style edge in Plum. The Picot style edge was worked into the back loops of the previous round to try and keep edge-curling to a minimum. The Picot pattern was formed by working 3 slip stitches (to move you yarn with no height across your blanket edge), then working 1 UK double (US single), 3 chain and a further UK double (US single) all into the next stitch to create your Picot shape – please see Lucy’s blog for the full “official” version!

Voila! One finished Granny Stripe Blanket with its border!

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44 thoughts on “Attic 24 Granny Stripe Blanket and Edging – tried and tested

  1. Pingback: The Making of Magic – Heidi Bears Puff the Magic Stegosaurus Crochet Pattern | thestitchsharer

  2. This is amazing. I’ve already have the yarn, just can’t wait to start this projekt. Could you tell me how and where did you wave the yarn ends? I would be happy if you could answer me. Thanks. And congratulations!

  3. Your blanket is fantastic. After making a giant (double bed sized) granny square blanket as my first ever attempt, I moved on to two ripple blankets; one single and one double and have very much enjoyed making those.

    The granny stripe blanket is on my to do list along with another pattern which I saw online recently where the end result looks like this …
    Baby blanket from http://winkieflash.nl/2013/01/21/the-baby-groovy-ghan-tadah/

    Can I ask what the overall dimensions of your finished blanket using the 18 balls of wool turned out to be?

    • Hi Natalie, I love your blanket. What a fabulous pattern.
      I have measured my granny stripe blanket for you – I used 18 balls of stylecraft (I was after an extra yellow stripe) for mine and it’s 210cm x 230cm. It was really therapeutic to make as I could just crochet my trebles without thinking!

      • That’s a really good size! I think I might begin on that next. I sort of have an Attic 24 pack in that there’s a suitcase under the bed with one ball of every stylecraft colour there is inside it. I dip into this to begin a project and replace and purchase as I go!

        Although Spring is round the corner, I am hedging for three tonal greys and maybe a bit of a pale blue at each end in something like the sherbet colour as a small change running through it.

        Know what you mean about trebles; I feel that way about my ripples!

  4. Pingback: Thursday Thoughts of Inspiration « craftgirl78

  5. Very pretty! I just got the same pack of yarn and am deciding whether to do this pattern or not. I was wondering if the pack would finish a blanket that size – thanks for showing us how much you had left! You did a great job!

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